14 Best Tennis Racquets

Choosing the right tennis racquet is the most challenging decision a tennis player can make. This will be the weapon of choice in the sport, and most people are looking at using the same racquet for at least a year or two before switching to something else.

With such a big investment, it is worth taking the time to find the right fit. Most tennis players who take the game seriously understand that they need a performance-level racquet to compete in the modern game. There are numerous brands, and at least a handful of options from all those companies as well. How is a person supposed to narrow their decision down?

The guide below attempts to do precisely that. There is no guarantee that a person will ultimately go with one of the 14 racquets listed, but at least a couple of them will feel good enough for players to understand what they are looking for.


1. Babolat Pure Aero

The racquet made famous by Rafael Nadal is certainly a popular one at all levels. One of the stand out features of the Babolat Pure Aero is that the standard, 100 square inch version can cater to just about any type of player’s game. World-class players use this racquet, while it’s still versatile enough to help players just learning the game, and anyone in between.

They have expanded the line where there are several different options for different types of players as well. A player can get a heavier Pure Aero if they wish, or go with a lighter one. There are extended-length versions of this racquet, giving people an extra bit of length to reach shots and improve their serve.

Known as a line of racquet that helps players hit with considerable pace and spin, players can take it to another level by using RPM Blast, or other polyester strings. It’s a very aggressive way to play tennis, and although not everyone buys in, it certainly seems to be the option for many players right now.

When demoing new racquets, it’s always worth giving the Pure Aero a try. It’s one of the most spin-friendly racquets available right now, if that’s something your looking for, this might be the racquet for you.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 317g
Balance4pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight324

Pros

  • Versatile racquet for all skill levels
  • Built for the modern game
  • Multiple options for a more tailored fit

Cons

  • Not very arm friendly
  • Tough for older players to adjust to

2. Head Graphene 360 Speed Pro

A racquet that is fully endorsed by Novak Djokovic is obviously going to perform great off the ground. Players who are looking to play an aggressive style from the baseline will get a lot from the Speed Pro line from Head. They have made some vast improvements thanks to the Graphene used in the line, and players of various skill levels have gravitated towards it.

The modern game is all about having consistent, powerful strokes from the baseline. If a player is unable to keep up in rallies from back behind the baseline consistently, they are going to struggle at any level. The Speed Pro helps people make the shots they are scrambling to, and extend the rally as long as possible.

The common complaint from people who try this racquet is that power is not quite there like some people would like. It’s a challenge to find a lot of free power that some people might be lacking to compete with the best of the best. If a person fails to swing hard at shots naturally, they aren’t going to get the same type of results. Consider this more of a control-oriented racquet for people to use.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.5 oz / 326g
Balance6pts HL
String Pattern18×20
Swingweight318

Pros

  • Excellent control from the baseline
  • Returns and groundstrokes are easy
  • Different variations available of the racquet for a customized fit

Cons

  • Not a lot of free power
  • Serve takes a while to dial-in

3. Wilson Pro Staff 97

Many people look at the Wilson Pro Staff 97 as that bridge between the old generation of tennis racquets, and the modern game. It is one of the smallest head sizes people will find consistently on tour these days, and it has trickled down to the recreational level as well.

Thanks to Roger Federer using this model, it continues to be a very hot selling racquet. Unfortunately, the people who don’t really have a good experience with it simply shouldn’t have a racquet like this in the first place. It takes a very talented player to maximize their skills with a smaller head size that is not that forgiving, but some people will see a huge difference.

What the Pro Staff does extremely well is give a player who can generate their own power all the control they need. Whether it be groundstrokes, volleys, slice or serves, players can put the ball anywhere they want. It’s a pretty heavy racquet at 12.6 ounces strung, and the tight string pattern allows for players to have a great connection with the ball throughout each stroke.

Without question, this is one racquet that every person should try out before they jump all the way in. Without putting in a little bit of time with the racquet, some people will dismiss it as cumbersome, low-powered and not capable of keeping up in the modern game. In the right hands, it is the best racquet available.

Head Size97 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.6 oz / 329g
Balance7pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight320

Pros

  • Excellent control on all shots
  • Provides an advantageous sweet spot
  • Allows for considerable pace behind the ball

Cons

  • Heavy and hard to maneuver for some players
  • Sweet spot is smaller than many other racquets

4. Babolat Pure Drive

Players have loved the Extreme line from Head for quite a while now. Known as perhaps the most powerful and spin-friendly racquet from the company, Advanced players should have no issues cranking the ball and putting the ball deep in the court. It takes a certain type of player to control the shots, but those who already have great control can really benefit from the extra boost.

Rallying with this racquet puts a lot of things in perspective. When people try out the racquet for the first time, they are usually blown away with early results. It does take some getting used to since control isn’t the best, but the power and spin are noticeable right away.

Players can tweak the racquet to their own liking by using the right string. For players who really want to hit with a lot of spin, this racquet can do precisely that when equipped with the correct string.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 318g
Balance4pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight324

Pros

  • Powerful racquet for its weight class
  • Spin potential is as high as any racquet out right now
  • Excellent racquet off the ground

Cons

  • Control takes a hit
  • Not a very comfortable racquet on the arm

5. Head Graphene 360 Extreme MP

Players have loved the Extreme line from Head for quite a while now. Known as perhaps the most powerful and spin-friendly racquet from the company, Advanced players should have no issues cranking the ball and putting the ball deep in the court. It takes a certain type of player to control the shots, but those who already have great control can really benefit from the extra boost.

Rallying with this racquet puts a lot of things in perspective. When people try out the racquet for the first time, they are usually blown away with early results. It does take some getting used to since control isn’t the best, but the power and spin are noticeable right away.

Players can tweak the racquet to their own liking by using the right string. For players who really want to hit with a lot of spin, this racquet can do precisely that when equipped with the correct string.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 318g
Balance3pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight328

Pros

  • Powerful racquet for its weight class
  • Spin potential is as high as any racquet out right now
  • Excellent racquet off the ground

Cons

  • Control takes a hit
  • Not a very comfortable racquet on the arm

6. Yonex EZONE

The Yonex EZONE line of racquets is the first of two different models from the company to make the list. The first thing that any person will notice if they are new to Yonex is that the unique head size can actually be beneficial in the right hands. Some people are initially turned off by a racquet that doesn’t look the same as all the other manufacturers, but Yonex has its loyal fans.

Many love that the isometric squarehead shape has a larger sweet spot, and that certainly comes in handy with the smaller version of this racquet. The 98 square inch head size is challenging at first for some players, but if they can consistently hit with it, there are a lot of added benefits. A player can keep a smaller head size without sacrificing the size of the sweet spot.

The EZONE falls on the control side of things it has a low flex rating and a tight string pattern, which leads to excellent control and touch no matter where a person finds themselves on the court. Although it is not the most powerful racquet, there is enough liveliness to the ball that people feel pretty confident hitting.

The focus with any control-oriented racquet is finding that one that provides just enough power to make a difference. This is one of the more forgiving control racquets, as the increased sweet spot does in fact work. The comfort level is solid enough that people are usually fine on that front as well.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 318g
Balance4pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight322

Pros

  • Isometric head shape provides a larger sweet spot
  • Excellent control anywhere on the court
  • Players feel connected with the ball when hitting

Cons

  • A lot of power must come from the player’s swing
  • Stability isn’t the greatest

7. Wilson Clash

When the Wilson Clash released, it was an instant hit in the tennis community. Many people have been waiting for a true breakthrough in tennis technology, and the comfort level that this racquet provides is second to none. How is Wilson able to do it? It comes down to their FreeFlex and StableSmart technologies.

The FreeFlex is great for overall flexibility in the frame. A player will notice that the racquet is not as stiff as just about any other performance racquet out there. It works directly with StableSmart, providing a comfort level not seen out of a performance racquet in this era.

As flexible and comfortable as the racquet is, some might be worried about power potential. The Clash does an excellent job of providing power for people who need it. It is not the most powerful racquet in the world, but it still does enough thanks to the huge sweet spot and the bigger head size.

All in all, people are usually blown away with the Wilson Clash as soon as they hit with it that first time. In an age where everyone is turning towards stiff racquets and polyester strings, this is a great racquet to play with while still keeping up with the modern game. So many people instantly fall in love with the racquet, making it one of the hottest sellers at this time.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11 oz / 312g
Balance9pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight312

Pros

  • Most comfortable racquet available right now
  • Excellent maneuverability for all-around success
  • Solid spin potential

Cons

  • Could use a bit more control
  • Expensive

8. Head Graphene 360 Instinct MP

The Head Graphene 360 Instinct is another great racquet for people who have a baseline-oriented game. The groundstrokes are easy to hit weighted shot, and the control is there for any type of player. Spin is also pretty easy to find access to, depending on how a person swings the racquet in the first place.

Although there are heavier versions of the Graphene 360 Instinct, the line earns the label as a very light and comfortable player’s racquet. Players will find that power is pretty easy to tap into, and it’s easy to take for cuts.

If a person isn’t too careful, control can’t get away from them at times. It’s not so apparent on the ground, but with serves and volleys, people need a little bit of time with the racquet to see a difference. This scares some people, but there is a bit of a learning curve.

For topspin, consistent groundstrokes and top-level manueverability, Head gets a lot right with these racquets, and it will only grow more now that there is an updated version out there with added comfort.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 318g
Balance4pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight320

Pros

  • Open string pattern allows for solid spin
  • Great manueverability
  • Built for fast strokes

Cons

  • Could use a bit more stability
  • Shots with touch are tough

9. Wilson Ultra Tour

The Wilson Ultra Tour has yet to receive the newest technology from the company, but that doesn’t make it obsolete. In fact, many still love the Ultra line of racquets from Wilson because they feel and play much like the Babolat Pure Aero and Pure Drive, with just a few differences. This is a powerful racquet that has spin potential many players love, and the number of tour players who count on it speaks for itself.

Before hitting with the Ultra for the first time, players will notice a very open string pattern not seen on other Wilson racquets. This is by design, allowing for increased power and spin. Players can also take advantage of a generous sweet spot that opens up so many different types of opportunities.

The Ultra differentiates itself from the Clash and Blade as perhaps the best option from Wilson for those who play a baseline type of game. Players can crank hard serves to start the point, and then play offense or defense from deep in the court.

Moving to the net is where the racquet has a bit of an issue. Players who struggle with volleys, slices, manueverability and more are not going to receive much help from the Ultra. The Ultra Tour provides a little more weight to punch balls at the net, but it might not be the best option if a lot of time is spent up there.

Head Size97 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.4 oz / 323g
Balance6pts HL
String Pattern18×20
Swingweight324

Pros

  • Excellent spin potential
  • One of the best racquets for all types of serves

Cons

  • Uses old Countervail technology
  • Not great at the net

10. Wilson Blade 98

The launch of the Wilson Blade line a few years ago received a ton of fanfare. The company wasn’t sure what to expect early on, but it proved to be a racquet many people enjoyed using at different skill levels.

The cool thing about the latest version is that it stays true to the Blade line, but adds the same type of flex technology that was made popular in the Clash racquet. The previous version used Countervail, but FeelFlex technology replaces that to make everything more flexible and stable.

Players have come to expect the Wilson Blade as being control-oriented. The very popular version that is 98 square inches and has an 18 x 20 string pattern is one of the best in the game from that perspective. Players can put the ball wherever they want when hitting, and now it is more comfortable than ever before.

Since the Wilson Blade line has a fairly closed string pattern, it is not a spin-friendly as some of the racquets out there. It also lacks a little bit of power, that’s the expected with any control-oriented racquet. If a player enjoys hitting flat shots and moving their opponent around with pinpoint accuracy, The Wilson Blade is going to help in that regard.

Head Size98 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.3 oz / 320g
Balance3pts HL
String Pattern18×20
Swingweight328

Pros

  • Very control-oriented with every shot
  • FeelFlex technology makes is the most comfortable Blade ever
  • Low stiffness rating

Cons

  • Tough to generate a ton of spin
  • Low-powered

11. Head Graphene 360 Radical MP

There have been some very loyal players to the Radical line for several years now, and the latest version does nothing to effect that loyalty. Players looking to hit impressive groundstrokes with plenty of spin will love this relatively light racquet. When strung, it is just 11 ounces, and the swingweight is one of the lowest out of the performance racquets.

The weight of the racquet helps in a number of ways. For starters, it makes the racquet a bit more playable for the intermediate player. There are plenty of high-level players who use the Radical, but it is versatile enough to be used by different people.

It also helps players take for, aggressive cuts at the ball without having to worry too much about control. The set up of the racquet provides a good amount of control, and people are pleased with balls off the ground, volleys, and even serves.

Like the rest of the Head racquets out right now, the Graphene 360 Radical provides a great amount of stability and additional power. It’s still not considered an incredibly powered racquet, but it is better than the previous version.

There will be some people who think this weight just a little too light for their liking. There are heavier versions of the Radical line, and there is also the opportunity to add lead tape. This might just be the most player-friendly Radical racquet ever made by the company. Now is the time to hop on the bandwagon and use it to step up on the court.

Head Size98 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11 oz / 312g
Balance6pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight324

Pros

  • Spin-friendly
  • Great control for a lighter racquet
  • Comfortable shotmaking all over the court

Cons

  • Might be too light for some high-level players
  • Power is improved, but not insane

12. Babolat Pure Strike

The release of the Babolat Pure Strike a few years ago coffee attention of a tennis world. This is a company that does not produce that many racquet options, so when they do release one, since it’s initial release, It has carved out a great spot for them that makes them just a bit different from the Pure Aero and Pure Drive.

The hybrid beam construction used in the Pure Strike series gives a player noticeably more control and feel. That is a common complaint with the other Babolat racquets, so having this option in the family is great. 

Another great feature of the Pure Strike is that a player has great stability during a match. The racquet can handle shots from any part of the court, making it perfect for the all-around player.

There really isn’t a true negative to this racquet, although some people might initially be frustrated with their serving game. It’s not as powerful on that stroke as the other Babolat racquet options, but a lot of it just takes getting used to. Off the ground is where this racquet really shines. 

It’s one of the best racquets to hit groundstrokes and returns consistently than ever before. Now available with numerous weight and length options, players can find a perfect fit.

Head Size98 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.4 oz / 323g
Balance4pts HL
String Pattern18×20
Swingweight325

Pros

  • Easy to maneuver
  • One of the best racquets for groundstrokes on the market
  • Outstanding control and feel on all shots

Cons

  • Could be a bit better on serves
  • Power is just a little more muted compared to other Babolat racquets

13. Tecnifibre ATP Tfight XTC

Technifibre is one racquet company that seems to get overlooked a bit by the general public. Even though they have been putting out quality racquets for quite some time, it took some convincing for people to try out something outside of their comfort zone.

Out of all the racquets they offer right now, the most friendly option comes from their Tfight series. The Tecnifibre ATP TFight XTC not only looks like a modern type of racquet, but it performs very well all around.

The biggest stand out features for the Tfight XTC is that it might be the most well-rounded control-oriented racquet. What that means is that players will definitely get great control, but they will also have access to a good amount of power. Usually, a player has to sacrifice one or the other, but Technifibre has done a great job of balancing things a bit more.

The best way to describe this racquet is that it won’t have that one defining feature, but it does everything pretty well. For example, it’s not the best with control or power, but it has the best blend.

The racquet is pretty easy to maneuver, but there are some better versions out there from companies. It’s comfortable, but still, a bit on the stiffer side when compared to some of the newer models releasing.

Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.4 oz / 323g
Balance3pts HL
String Pattern18×19
Swingweight329

Pros

  • Slick, modern-looking design
  • Control-oriented racquet helps with placement
  • Weight is easy to maneuver

Cons

  • Many players unfamiliar with Technifibre as a company
  • Does a lot of things well, but nothing great

14. Yonex VCORE Pro

The Yonex VCORE Pro is designed for higher-level players who mostly play from the baseline. Although it’s pretty easy to transition to the net and hit volleys, some players will feel like the racquet limits them from doing that too much. Of course, it comes down to a player’s strokes, and if they can maneuver the racquet fairly easily.

One thing a lot of people like about the VCORE Pro is that it’s control-oriented, without having to rely on a ton of weight. The standard model weighs 11.5 ounces, and it has a pretty low swingweight on top of that.

This lightweight racquet is just strong enough not to get pushed around, and the control is pretty impressive. The closed string pattern helps a lot with that control, as does the head size of the racquet. For players trying out different control racquets, this is one to pick in the end. It might just be the one that stands out above the rest.

Head Size97 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.5 oz / 326g
Balance7pts HL
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight318

Pros

  • Lightweight for a control-oriented racquet
  • Great comfort level thanks to reduced vibration
  • Strong enough to not get pushed around

Cons

  • Smaller head size isn’t for everyone
  • No free power

What To Look For In a Racquet

Reading up on tennis racquets is a great start for picking out the perfect option. There is a wealth of information out there, and we are just one website that tries to make the buying experience that much better.

Along with reading information, there is a ton to look for in a racquet that a person must do themselves. Think of this website, in particular, as a great starting point, but some choices need to be made by the individual to get what they want.

Finding The Perfect Fit

A good way to understand the most important parts of a tennis racquet is to pick one up for the very first time. What is noticeable from the beginning? A lot of people will gravitate towards the size and shape of the head, the weight and distribution of that weight, and grip size. 

If a player can nail down what they are looking for with these three things, it can narrow down the shopping process pretty quickly.

Head Size

The modern tennis racquet hovers right around 100 square inches for head size. Anything above that is considered slightly oversized, while anything smaller is for advanced players. Just a few decades ago, it would seem absurd that some of the top players in the world use a racquet that has a 100 square inch racquet, but this is the modern game.

  • 85-95 sq. inces = For more advanced players
  • 95-105 Inches = For all players
  • 106+ = For beginners

If a player is just starting out, stay away from anything under 100 square inches. It is not going to be that rewarding for players as they try to dial shots in and hit the sweet spot consistently. At the same time, going too big might make it challenging to get a new racquet later on.

That initial look at head size will tell a lot, but just some light hitting will tell a difference as well. Players will get a feel for how the racquet strikes the ball, and if the sweet spot is large enough.

Static & Swingweight

If a person has a pretty good idea on what type of head size they want for the racquet, next comes figuring out weight and weight distribution. It is important to look at both numbers, because a heavy racquet can feel pretty light when swinging, depending on the distribution of the weight.

  • Under 10.6 ounces (300g) is considered a lightweight racquet
  • 10.6-11.3 ounces (300-320g) is considered normal weight
  • Over 11.3 ounces (320g) is considered a heavy racquet
  • Lightweight racquets are generally aimed towards beginners
  • Heavy racquets are generally aimed for more advanced players

The general rule to follow is that beginners should look for a racquet that tends to be a bit head heavy. This will put some extra power behind shots, even if a person is not swinging particularly hard. Getting that extra bit of assistance is more rewarding for players.

For more experienced players, they can usually provide enough power on their own without any additional help. That means gravitating towards a more control-oriented racquet to keep shots in. These racquets tend to be either slightly head light, or evenly weighted. Having extra weight in the handle will help not only control and stability, but comfort as well.

Length of The Racquet

The standard length of an adult tennis racquet will be 27 inches. The vast majority of options out there will be exactly that, but some people go longer. Technically speaking, a racquet can’t be any longer than 29 inches, but most players don’t even attempt to get in that range. For practical purposes, almost every racquet is 27 to 28 inches long.

  • Shorter racquets are normally for younger players
  • Longer racquets are generally used by shorter players to get more reach and power when serving

Try a 27 inch, a 27.25-inch, and possibly a 27.5-inch racquet to tell the differences. Players who are a little on the shorter side might like the additional reach, but it does come at a sacrifice. A longer racquet will increase the swingweight, and make it a little harder to maneuver close to the net.

If a player is really struggling with their serve, that extra bit of length does help. It allows for a slightly different angle on contact, which can open up more opportunities for players to really succeed. Length is often overlooked as a customized option, because so many people feel like 27 inches is the only way to go. Just because a person has always used a 27-inch bracket, does not mean that they need to only use that going forward.

String Pattern

The two most common types of string patterns on racquets in today’s game are 16 x 19, and 18 x 20. These numbers are the amount of mains and crosses on a racquet. Different string patterns will make a racquet play slightly differently, even if everything else is the same.

  • 16×19 is the most popular and neutral string pattern
  • 16×18 cross is an open string pattern – more spin and power
  • 18×20 is a closed string pattern – more control

A lot of racquets with a head size of 100 square inches or more, using 16 x 19 strings will have an open string pattern. Open strings deflect just a bit more compared to a denser pattern, which gives players a little bit more power behind it shot. This added power can put shots deeper on the court with slightly more pace.

Open String Pattern (16×19)

Another advantage of open strings is that the strings have a snapping effect that helps with spin. Most professionals who hit with a lot of topspin have open string patterns, and that gives them a little more bite with each stroke.

Racquets with open string patterns tend to cost people more money, because strings are more likely to bend and notch. Anytime strings are moving more, that’s going to speed up the replacement process. It’s also harder to have pinpoint accuracy with an open string pattern, resulting in some errant shots for players.

Closed String Pattern (18×20)

For a more controlled experience, an 18 x 20 string pattern, or some other type of closed swing pattern, is the better way to go. Not only do players noticed more control on their shots, but many say that they have improved touch as well. A player can get away with not hitting with as much power if they can put the ball exactly where they want it.

Don’t expect strings to move around as much, which will reduce the number of broken strings. Try out both types of patterns, as some racquets will have an open and closed string pattern option in the same line.

Demo As Many Racquets As Possible

The tennis racquet is the most important part of the tennis game, so getting it right is essential. It’s certainly overwhelming to have so many choices, but after narrowing it down a bit, demo the top options as much as possible.

There are a few ways to demo a racquet in today’s world. The most convenient way is still to find a local tennis shop and work with them. Try to find a shop or a program that does not force a person to then buy a racquet from them. This will limit a person’s options when they are shopping and possibly finding better deals elsewhere.

Most demos will only last a few days, so make sure that the racquet is available when an actual time to play is available. A person can only tell so much when demoing a racquet and hitting against the wall. If possible, try to play against a quality opponent to get a feel for how things go.

Don’t forget to try out the racquet in all aspects of the game. Too many people will hit with a racquet, but not practice any serves or volleys at the net. In a match, that could really make a racquet a terrible fit for a player.

It won’t always work out this way, but if there are a few different version of the same demo racquet, request to demo one with the preferred strings. Demoing a racquet with multifilament strings is a lot different than using polyester strings. Some people become sour on a racquet because the strings mess up the feel. Try to avoid being fooled by this.

Look Into The Future

Players who already play competitively know that they have no other choice than to look strictly at the top of the line, performance models. For players who are still learning the game and building themselves up, shopping for a new racquet is a little more complicated. A person might not know if they should invest in a high-quality racquet now and learn to play with it, or buy a beginner or tweener racquet and update later on.

Think about what the plan is as far as tennis is concerned. If tennis ultimately becomes only a hobby or a way to get some exercise, a tweener racquet might be good enough. If the goal is to really start taking tennis seriously and taking the game to another level, then investing in a high-quality racquet from the beginning is a good way to go.

Updating tennis racquets too frequently can end up being very costly. It is best to do some solid research in the beginning to avoid this. Going with one of the more intermediate-friendly frames now can allow for some natural growth.

Final Tips On Buying A Tennis Racquet

Clicking on a tennis website to view all the racquet options can give anyone anxiety. There are hundreds of choices when considering all the minor differences within each line of racquets.

Take the time to find a racquet that feel right and performs well. At the same time, don’t let the search process become too overwhelming. Trying out too many demos won’t really provide much benefit. 

Any new racquet will also take time to feel just right. Don’t feel discouraged if the first few times with a new racquet ends up feeling like a step back. Players need to adapt to the new feel of their racquet, and continued practice will help. Some also have trouble getting the proper string and string tension at first, so a few adjustments are needed.

For your convenience, here are all the racquets I recommended above

  • Babolat Pure Aero
  • Head Graphene 360 Speed Pro
  • Wilson Pro Staff 97
  • Babolat Pure Drive
  • Head Graphene 360 Extreme MP
  • Yonex EZONE
  • Wilson Clash
  • Head Graphene 360 Instinct MP
  • Wilson Ultra Tour
  • Wilson Blade 98
  • Head Graphene 360 Radical MP
  • Babolat Pure Strike
  • Tecnifibre ATP TFight XTC
  • Yonex VCORE Pro

Fred Simonsson

I'm Fred, the guy behind TennisPredict. Apart from writing here, I play tennis on a semi-professional level and coaches upcoming talents.

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