How Much Do Tennis Lessons Cost?

Becoming a solid tennis player takes a lot of hard work and dedication to the craft. It’s nearly impossible to make it to a high level without getting some type of instruction along the way. In fact, the best players in the world ultimately spent hundreds if not thousands of hours going through some form of tennis lessons to get to where they are today.

How much do tennis lessons cost? Is it worth it? Several different factors ultimately determine price, but finding the right instructor can make all the difference in the world in a person’s game. The range in price in the United States usually sits somewhere between $25 and $100. 

Most tennis players believe that taking lessons at least once helps significantly in jumping to a new level. Since not all lessons are created equally, finding the right opportunity can dictate how someone feels.

What Impacts The Pricing of Tennis Lessons?

There are a few different factors that impact the pricing of tennis lessons. It’s important to do as much research as possible beforehand so that pricing is a bit easier to gauge. Every tennis player is looking to get the most out of their money, so understanding how pricing works a little bit better can ensure that there is no shock.

Age/Skill Level

The price of tennis lessons can vary depending on the age of the person getting instruction, and their skill level.

Tennis lessons for children tend to cost less, since they are not as intense as adult training. The most expensive lessons tend to be those for teenagers, since they are trying to really push themselves for a chance to play high school, college, or even professional tennis.

Since not all people strive to be the best of the best, skill level matters as well. Tennis lessons to learn how to play casually are probably going to be a little less expensive than those trying to look for a very intense workout. It also helps that lower-level players do not need highly sought-after coaches to help.

Individual vs. Group Lessons

Here are some price examples for tennis lessons in the United States:

  • Private Lesson (1 Player): 40-100$
  • Semi-Private Lesson (2 Players): 25-50$
  • Group Lesson (3+ Players): 15-40$

Tennis coaches have to make their money in some way for every hour they spend instructing. One way to help offset the cost is to offer group tennis lessons instead of individual lessons. There is still quite a bit of teaching going on, but the financial burden is not 100% put on a single individual.

This might work for some people, but frustrate others. Those who want to maximize their time as much as possible will feel like an individual lesson is the only way to go.

A group lesson cannot only help out those who already have a basic understanding of the game, but it makes it a more social experience as well. There’s also an opportunity to get more of a workout from a group lesson, since it usually involves some form of actual play.

Maybe the best way to figure out if an individual or group lesson is best is to try one of each in the beginning. This way, people can understand if they get the proper individual instruction they need in a group setting. If they feel like they need more, they can always go to individual lessons to get the job done.

Teacher Reputation

An instructor’s reputation is a huge determining factor in the prices. Simply put, the more success a coach has had, the more expensive the instructions become.

Being able to say that an ex-tennis player at the professional level is now available for lessons is a huge selling point. However, they might not always be the best at coaching. Maybe they struggle a bit to get points across, or the price is just too much.

On the other hand, some of the best instructors in tennis history never played the game at the highest level. They can still have quite a bit of success because they can teach the game and identify what a player needs to improve on to take it to the next level.

Finding out a teacher’s reputation is a lot easier than ever before. There are review sites online that talk about tennis instructors, and there’s also word of mouth. Tennis coaches with outstanding credentials will almost always cost more, but it might be worth it in the end.

Facility

The facility the instructions are taking place at can dictate the overall price. For example, some coaches only work out of one particular facility, so they have to go with the pricing given to them by that club. Others are actually paying on a per lesson basis, so they have to incorporate that pricing in with the total.

Do some research on a facility before signing up for a lesson. Some really good instructors are located in subpar facilities that make them a good deal. Others might have all the looks of a great facility, but lack the teaching pros to make a definitive change in a player.

Frequency

Most instructors giving tennis lessons are going to be a little more flexible with the pricing if a consistent relationship is developed. It can be steady income for the instructor, which is much better than searching for constant clients during their off time.

The discount will usually not be anything too crazy, but it’s enough to make a little bit of an impact on a person’s bank account. It’s always worth looking into if the goal is to take lessons on a fairly consistent basis.

If the instructor does not offer a discount directly, perhaps the facility does. Even if it saves on court fees or something similar, that little bit of money can add up.

Are Tennis Lessons Ultimately Worth It?

Due to the nature of the game, tennis is a sport that requires a lot of practice, and refined strokes to move up in playing level. While players can gradually move up without any actual instruction, it is usually the most beneficial for people to take lessons and see progression.

The frequency of lessons largely depends on how serious a person is about increasing their skill level. Some might feel like they are getting everything they need in one lesson per week. Others could need instruction multiple times a week to try to improve quickly.

Ultimately, most people will find a fit that is right for them. From there, they can start to make very smart overall decisions with their time and money.

Fred Simonsson

I'm Fred, the guy behind TennisPredict. Apart from writing here, I play tennis on a semi-professional level and coach upcoming talents.

Recent Posts