7 Best Dunlop Tennis Racquets

Dunlop has always been a steady player in the tennis racquet industry. They offer variety for all types of players, keep things simple and easy to understand for shoppers, and always seem to be one of the more affordable options on the market.

What are the best Dunlop tennis racquets out there right now? From beginners to advanced players, these are the most dependable Dunlop options worth checking out.


1. Dunlop CX 200 Tour

Dunlop CX 200 TourSpecs
Head Size95 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.7 oz / 332g
Balance7pts Head Light
Stiffness62
String Pattern18×20
Swingweight319

As is the case with most tour models, the beauty of the Dunlop CX 200 Tour 18×20 is that it has a little more heft behind every shot. Players can have great control and feel, while also having effortless acceleration with a swing weight of just 319.

Groundstrokes are great with this racquet, and the 18×20 string pattern also helps quite a bit with control. Players who want to feel like they are in control of every point will love this racquet, even if it is a bit on the smaller side with head size compared to common options out there in today’s game.

At 95 in.², it is not for everyone, but it is worth a try for those who are up for the challenge. However, I wouldn’t recommend it to beginners.

Best For:

  • Advanced players wanting extra control and feel out of a smaller head size.

2. Dunlop CX 200

Dunlop CX 200Specs
Head Size98 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.4 oz / 323g
Balance6pts Head Light
Stiffness64
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight317

The CX 200 received a few upgrades with this new generation of racquets, giving players better feedback and control. There is still a lot of power and spin with this racquet, especially for players who already rely on that with their current racquet setup.

The 98 in.² size is perfect for those who still have a good amount of control and feel without sacrificing much. It is a catch-all option for a lot of different players, and those with an advanced game will start to dial in pretty quickly. You can read our full review in this post.

Best For:

  • Players who want a well-rounded racquet for a modern game.

3. Dunlop CX 400

Dunlop CX 400Specs
Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)10.7 oz / 303g
Balance1pts Head Light
Stiffness71
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight319

The one complaint people have had about the CX 400 in the past is that it does not have quite the same amount of feel as some would like. The good news is, there is an updated feel with this racquet so that intermediate and even advanced players can benefit.

Players wanting the extra boost in power and spin will notice it right away, and the racquet is well-rounded enough for all types of players.

The PowerGrid StringTech system, which is used in quite a few different racquets from this company, does an excellent job of creating a good amount of string space to make it as spin-friendly as possible. It also has a very muted feel that a lot of players love, giving them the confidence they need to take the game to the next level.

Best for:

  • All-around players looking for a little bit of a boost with power and spin.

4. Dunlop CX 400 Tour

Dunlop CX 400 TourSpecs
Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 318g
Balance4pts Head Light
Stiffness66
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight322

If the standard CX 400 does not provide enough power, this one might be an option worthy of consideration. It goes up a few grams, but it is not too heavy that players will feel like they are wearing down with each shot.

It is still an all-court weapon that a lot of players love because they get a little more control over their power, and the spin potential stays the same.

Comfort is nothing that players need to worry about when they jump up to a slightly heavier racquet. With a swingweight of 322, and a pretty muted feel overall, it will not feel poorly at all. In fact, many people believe that this is slightly better with feel than the lighter option.

All in all, it is a stable racquet that might cater to a more advanced player who feels like they are getting pushed around with a lighter racquet.

Best for:

  • Advanced players looking for a little more heft behind all of the shots.

5. Dunlop FX 500

Dunlop FX 500Specs
Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.2 oz / 318g
Balance4pts Head Light
Stiffness71
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight314

Players who have an extremely modern game will absolutely love the FX 500. It is a racquet that feels very light when swinging around, and that means speedy strokes overall. Players can also customize the racquet as much as they want to get the feel that makes the most sense for them.

Groundstrokes are outstanding with this racquet, as long as a player has at least some control over their shots. The control is pretty decent with this racquet, but it is very easy to start hitting too much and go for too much along the way.

Serving is pretty easy with this racquet as well, as players will get a lot of free points off of their serve. Make sure to demo this racquet to see the power firsthand, but do not shy away from it if it seems a little uncontrollable at first. Players have to ease into the racquet to see the full effect.

Best For:

  • Any player wanting a little more power with their shots.

6. Dunlop SX 300

Dunlop SX 300Specs
Head Size100 sq. in
Length27 in
Weight (strung)11.3 oz / 320g
Balance4pts Head Light
Stiffness65
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight326

The Dunlop SX 300 is one of the most spin-friendly racquets not only from the company, but on the market today. At a 100 in.² head size, it is the perfect weapon for the modern type of game. There is an increase in maneuverability which also helps, and players can really get the most out of this racquet at any skill level.

Power is one thing, but being able to control it is another. Having easy access to spin also helps the modern player keep the ball deep into the court and opponents on their toes. This does just that, and it is a great racquet to grow with as a player becomes more and more comfortable with their play.

Best For:

  • Players needing a little more control with their power, as well as easy access to spin.

7. Dunlop SX 600

Dunlop SX 600Specs
Head Size105 sq. in
Length27.25 in
Weight (strung)10.2 oz / 289g
Balance1pts Head Light
Stiffness66
String Pattern16×19
Swingweight313

The final racquet to make this list is a little bit different from the rest. Coming in with a head size of 105 in.² means this racquet is not for the advanced player, but more for those who are either learning, or slowing down. The extra bit of head size allows for additional forgiveness on mishits, and the lightness of the racquet is suitable for maneuverability.

This might not be a perfect racquet for players trying to take their game to the next level, but it is great for what it does. It has a great blend of power, speed, and spin as a player tries to get to another level.

It also makes for a pretty solid doubles racquet, as players feel very comfortable at the net putting the ball wherever they want it. It might be a little bit different from what people are used to if they are coming from a player’s racquet, but this might be suitable for those who are not quite at that level currently.

Best For:

  • Intermediate players, or those slowing down and wanting a bigger sweet spot.

Are Dunlop Racquets Worth It?

The extensive line offered by Dunlop has just about every type of player covered. With plenty of options for advanced players, in particular, the best thing to do is to try out as many as possible and see what works best.

There is always the opportunity to customize a racquet as well, which is better done with lighter racquets in general. Even though they have somewhat of a reputation of being an older company that does not have the same innovation as others, they have shown that they are making great strides in keeping up with the competition in the last few years.

For your convenience, here are all the Dunlop racquets I recommended above.


What Tennis Racquets we recommend from other Brands:

Fred Simonsson

I'm Fred, the guy behind TennisPredict. Apart from writing here, I play tennis on a semi-professional level and coach upcoming talents.

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